‘Business’ Articles:

Dear Michael Arrington, Perhaps You Are Bored Because You Are Boring

January 1st, 2013 by jeremychone | 8 Comments »

With all due respect, and I have some for your very early TechCrunch days, your new post on your ex-blog about how bored you have become made me chuckle.

Chuckle, because it was not the “I am bored and I should do something about it” kind of bored that we all might be once in a while, but rather the typical Arrington way of lecturing an industry by saying “I am bored because you guys are boring.”

Not surprisingly, you have not changed from your tech media mogul days, when you were lecturing the media industry about what was or was not ethical and how real tech journalism should be done, while many could have easily returned the favor if they had a chance or a voice.

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Introducing BriteSnow, Inc – We Build HTML5 Enterprise Applications For Web, Mobile, and Tablets

October 24th, 2012 by jeremychone | Comments Off


Over the last three years, I have been very busy building a HTML5 focused consulting business in San Francisco, BriteSnow, Inc. The welcome post says it all: we build high-end Enterprise and Social HTML5 applications; we are obsessed with speed and quality of delivery; we have created a very agile and modern development process and architecture approach; and, best of all, we give all the keys to our clients by transferring our HTML5 expertise to their internal teams and allowing them to stop, pause, and resume the engagement on a one-day notice (in other words, literally zero lock-in).

Beside of all this, the one thing that sets us apart from others is our passion for all of the details surrounding all aspects of an application experience, from server and cloud architecture to UI responsiveness and HTML5 optimization.

We are convinced that HTML is the technology of the future for a large majority of applications from a business as well as a technical point of view. And the thing we discovered during this three years is that with the right architectural approach, building advanced HTML5 applications for PCs, mobile devices, and tablets can be as efficient and scalable as creating desktop or native type of applications.

To accomplish this vision, we created two open source technologies, Snow, which is a Java lightweight server framework based on Google Guice, and brite, an lightweight and DOM Centric HTML5 MVC framework based on jQuery. Both of these technologies are completely free, fully open source (Apache V2 for Snow and MIT for Brite), and are designed to build high-end modern applications using the best of Java on the server, and the best of HTML5 on the client.

We are going to blog quite a bit to share everything we have learned over the last few years about building high end HTML5 applications. So, feel free to follow us on
Twitter, Facebook, or Google Plus.

Feel free to visit us at BriteSnow.com or contact us at info@britesnow.com

How Google can checkmate iPhone

March 1st, 2010 by jeremychone | 10 Comments »

When looking at the future of the mobile market, we can clearly see two big contenders, Apple and Google. While Apple has a definite head start, Google mobile’s strategy and execution has been impressive. In the last couple of years, Google has managed to create an open platform, engage with a wide variety of device manufacturer partners, and promote its own branded device. Although iPhone fans might disagree, it is fair to say that, with the latest Android 2.x generation of devices (i.e., NexusOne), there are fewer and fewer hardware and software differentiators between the two solutions.

The dilemma: iPhone is still the big gorilla

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Silverlight: Good for Adobe, Bad for Microsoft

August 12th, 2009 by jeremychone | 18 Comments »

While many see Microsoft Silverlight as an Adobe Flash killer, I actually think Adobe should rejoice that Microsoft is competing with Adobe on its own turf (i.e., media plug-ins) rather than putting all its energy, as it once did, into Web standards and innovation (IE 5.0 was the most robust and compliant Web browser of its time).

If Microsoft were to take a similar approach to the one it embraced in 1995, when it actually took the lead in Web technologies and provided the best Open Web browser implementation, new media functionalities such as video and 2D/3D would become an intrinsic part of the Web, making media plug-ins irrelevant to its future. In other word, if Microsoft were to go full Open Web (with SVG, Canvas, Smil, HTML 5, Video, and CSS3) Adobe Flash would be history in couple of years. However, Microsoft decided to follow Adobe’s plug-in strategy by forking visually rich capabilities into the plug-in world and throwing itself into a completely new market.

Why? Why follow when you can lead?

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Myths about JavaFX, Android, and J2ME

June 8th, 2009 by jeremychone | 27 Comments »

At JavaOne, Larry Ellison has made some very encouraging statements about Oracle’s commitments to Java, JavaFX, and the mobile developer market. It is certainly good news that Oracle (i.e., Larry) sees the significance of the Java platform in its integrality. However, there are many misunderstandings about the relationship between Java, JavaFX, and Android that even confuse the new Java owner. Here are some clarifications.

1) JavaFX is NOT Java.

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Oracle on Sun Java, MySQL, OpenOffice, and Linux

May 19th, 2009 by jeremychone | 15 Comments »

If you are lucky, and curious enough, Oracle can be the best place to learn the enterprise software market. I have worked at Oracle for about seven years and, in my entire career, it is where I have learned the most about enterprise software. When Oracle announced it was buying Sun, I was actually not that surprised, and I thought it was to be expected after the IBM escape. Oracle is in a self-fulfilling prophecy to consolidate the enterprise software market and, after IBM turned down what could have been a great match for open source and Java, Oracle had to jump in. Larry Ellison and Safra Catz are great market strategists, and Sun should have been on their radar for a long time. Larry has also been good friends with Scott McNealy, and this topic must have come up many times over the years.

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Are You a Seesmic or Balsamiq Entrepreneur?

March 19th, 2009 by jeremychone | 24 Comments »

In the software industry, and probably in other industries as well, there are two types of startups: the scale-first type and the monetize-first type (sometimes called lifestyle business). Any organization needs to eventually do both, but in the beginning, a startup needs to decide to focus on scale or monetization. Seesmic and Balsamiq are great 2008 examples of each type of startup. (Good comment from Vasudev Ram, Not everyone needs to or wishes to becomes a Google or a Yahoo! or a Microsoft)

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Software to Rule the New Mobile Market

October 8th, 2008 by jeremychone | 3 Comments »

The value chain used to be one of the main differences between the mobile and PC markets. The PC industry was driven by software vendors (i.e., Microsoft, Apple, Oracle), while the mobile industry was controlled by the Telcos and device manufacturers. For a long time, the Telcos  even had the power to remove features from devices that they felt caused too much competition with their own service offerings. For example, tethering and other features frequently were disabled on early versions of Windows Mobile devices. Interestingly, iPhones 3G, despite its flying pixels, still does not have tethering nor allows it. I am not sure if it is an iPhone limitation or another example of Telcos control.

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Seven Design Principles for Enterprise Collaboration 2.0

September 16th, 2008 by jeremychone | 6 Comments »

The two premises of this article are as follows:

  1. Social Networking is the method of connecting and communicating with the purpose of increasing knowledge (of people and of domain).
  2. Collaboration is the method of organizing knowledge and expertise to efficiently accomplish a particular task.

So, Social Networking is about sharing and discovering, and collaboration is about organizing and creating. Although informal, the point of these definitions is to demonstrate the similar but inherently distinctive meanings of collaboration and social networking.

The latest challenge for an enterprise is that social networking has undergone significant innovation cycles, mostly on the consumer side, and collaboration has not kept pace. As a consequence, an enterprise is often tempted to substitute collaboration by social networking, which could lead to an oversized enterprise social network with very little productivity gain, or even a loss, due to the over-communication side effect.

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Which Open Source License?

September 9th, 2008 by jeremychone | 17 Comments »

Which Open Source LicenseFor a commercial entity, building an effective open source strategy can be a relatively daunting task. Open Source strategy discussions tend to revolve around licensing. Typical questions are, ”Should we use dual licensing?,” “Should we use GPL or BSD?,” “What are the risks of GPL?,” “Can the licensing help us drive users to our commercial assets?,” or “What are the competitive risk associated with each type of license?“

Well, while the licensing questions are pertinent and will need to be answered at some point, the real questions are “What? Why? And How much [open]?”

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