‘Web2.0’ Articles:

Introducing BriteSnow, Inc – We Build HTML5 Enterprise Applications For Web, Mobile, and Tablets

October 24th, 2012 by jeremychone | Comments Off


Over the last three years, I have been very busy building a HTML5 focused consulting business in San Francisco, BriteSnow, Inc. The welcome post says it all: we build high-end Enterprise and Social HTML5 applications; we are obsessed with speed and quality of delivery; we have created a very agile and modern development process and architecture approach; and, best of all, we give all the keys to our clients by transferring our HTML5 expertise to their internal teams and allowing them to stop, pause, and resume the engagement on a one-day notice (in other words, literally zero lock-in).

Beside of all this, the one thing that sets us apart from others is our passion for all of the details surrounding all aspects of an application experience, from server and cloud architecture to UI responsiveness and HTML5 optimization.

We are convinced that HTML is the technology of the future for a large majority of applications from a business as well as a technical point of view. And the thing we discovered during this three years is that with the right architectural approach, building advanced HTML5 applications for PCs, mobile devices, and tablets can be as efficient and scalable as creating desktop or native type of applications.

To accomplish this vision, we created two open source technologies, Snow, which is a Java lightweight server framework based on Google Guice, and brite, an lightweight and DOM Centric HTML5 MVC framework based on jQuery. Both of these technologies are completely free, fully open source (Apache V2 for Snow and MIT for Brite), and are designed to build high-end modern applications using the best of Java on the server, and the best of HTML5 on the client.

We are going to blog quite a bit to share everything we have learned over the last few years about building high end HTML5 applications. So, feel free to follow us on
Twitter, Facebook, or Google Plus.

Feel free to visit us at BriteSnow.com or contact us at info@britesnow.com

Louis Gray now lives in Chrome: Is browser-only the future of software?

September 2nd, 2011 by jeremychone | Comments Off

Louis Gray wrote a nice post today about his new home, Google Chrome. He describes how he lives in one (actually two) browser(s) all day long without the need for a traditional software application.

There is no doubt that Cloud-based applications is where the growth is, or that Google is currently the most advanced provider of horizontal productivity Cloud-based applications, and that for some users this is plenty enough.

The bigger question is this: Are browser-only applications the future of applications? In other words, 20 years from now, will all applications live within a browser? Will Native applications be relegated to legacy applications?

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Adobe quits Flash, goes full HTML5

April 1st, 2011 by jeremychone | 6 Comments »

We’ve received word that, in an unusually honest and brave move from a big corporation, Adobe is going to announce that they will officially deprecate Flash in favor of HTML5 for rich Web and mobile experiences.

A new executive from Adobe is expected to say:

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I finally discovered where cloud computing comes from! (Hint: monkeys, again)

April 1st, 2011 by jeremychone | 2 Comments »

Nowadays, any Internet-connected organization is either running its services on a cloud, providing a cloud service, or both. From infrastructure cloud, to platform cloud, to on-premise cloud, cloud computing is everything and everywhere, and this omnipresence begs the two following questions:

How did the Internet work before cloud computing existed?

And, where does cloud computing come from?

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The Three Sides of HTML5, and the Only One That Matters.

March 3rd, 2011 by jeremychone | 1 Comment »

Over the last 12 months, there has been a tremendous amount of buzz about HTML5, and like everything that gets buzz, some good and some bad are coming out of it.

On the good side, the industry is now unanimously agreeing that HTML is a technology of the future and not a legacy one, and there is an amazing competitiveness among its implementers (Mozilla, Google, Apple, and Microsoft). The bad side is that lots of people tend to misinterpret what HTML5 really is, and this confusion is a great source for its detractors to spread FUD around it.

To make sense out of this chaos, it helps to know that HTML5 can be split into three façades, and depending of which you pick, you will have a different appreciation of its readiness and potential.

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To Flash or to Open Web

June 25th, 2009 by jeremychone | 10 Comments »

Nowadays, building [rich] Web applications can be quite challenging, as the proliferation of Web technologies has become overwhelming and confusing. The real challenge is that many interesting new Web technologies are being promoted by various groups, and it can be quite difficult for a developer or architect to filter the practical and future-proof ones from the cool and volatile ones.

As a rule of thumb, open technologies tend to be more pervasive and longer lasting (especially for the Internet) than proprietary technologies, which tend to bring more advanced capabilities early on. Consequently, Web application developers need to be pragmatically-open, by choosing open technologies whenever possible, but also by not hesitating to use proprietary ones when required. It is not about being religious about openness or anything else, but rather about being diligent so that one is able to choose the right technology to maximize the chances of success of the target application. In other words, it should not be a personal and emotional decision, but rather a business and rational one.

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How I got Censored from Techcrunch: L’Arroseur Arrosé

June 10th, 2009 by jeremychone | 22 Comments »

Disclosure: This article has some drama, which I usually try to avoid on this blog. However, I think this drama leads to good content and an interesting experiment.

The Drama: L’Arroseur Arrosé

Popular tech bloggers tend to have an inner capability to manufacture drama, and that is exactly what Michael Arrington did [again] on the Leo Laporte Live video show last Saturday. While Michael was very fast to give his version of the facts on his blog, commenting back has proven to be a little bit harder—at least, it was for me.

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Enterprise Web vs Consumer Web [2.0]: Top Six Differences

March 6th, 2009 by jeremychone | 9 Comments »
For quick scan, follow the bold words.

Although there is evidence that the two styles will converge in the future, enterprise and consumer Web architecture and technology are quite different today. If one talks to an enterprise application architect, he or she will probably say that while consumer Web applications are cute, simple, and sometimes useful, their architectures and technologies are merely a bunch of scripts and hacks put together. If one talks to a consumer Web architect, she or he will probably say that enterprise software is overly complex, often unusable, and based on over-priced and under-performing technologies (i.e., JSF or Portal). (See the previous post about Web Developer Spectrum.)

Having lived in both worlds, I can see some truth in both arguments; however, I think that most of the divergence comes from a different set of requirements that leads to separate technical routes.  

I see six main differences between consumer and enterprise Web Applications:

1) Scale (Users vs Applications)

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Search Oriented Tagging

September 30th, 2008 by jeremychone | 5 Comments »

Tagging has been a relatively popular, human-driven method for organically categorizing information on the Web. Users are now accustomed to tagging the content that they are publishing or bookmarking.

However, by design, tagging requires users to have some sort of writing privilege, which greatly limits its reach potential. Practically speaking, it means that if a user wants to tag an item on a system (e.g, Youtube, Flickr, or delicious) he or she must have an account on that system and be logged in at the time of the operation.

While this is probably not an issue for major Internet services, it can be a chicken-and-egg issue for new, upcoming services that do not yet have a large enough community to build a meaningful tag cloud. How can a new service maximize its community tag cloud if it doesn’t yet have a community?

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Flying Pixels

August 13th, 2008 by jeremychone | 9 Comments »

With the emergence of new technologies such as AJAX, Flash, and Silverlight, and popular applications such as Google Map and iPhone, the temptation for developers to fully and deeply animate their upcoming applications has become almost irresistible.

While slick animations and transitions are certainly useful for emotionally driven applications, such as car configurators, and some applications or components such as Google Map and charting, they should not be used as a substitute for a good interactive design. Application developers need to realize that these animations and transitions come at an extra design and development cost (no matter what tool they are using). 

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